Month: November 2011

Biblical Life Video Update for December 2011

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biblical life video update

CB064047New Bond Servant Series

We have begun a new video series on the "Bond Servant." God has been releasing a new powerful anointing into these sessions that is transforming lives! Allow this new level of anointing to speak into your life and prepare you for what God is going to do in 2012 and beyond.


 

The Bond Servant – Part 1

An Introduction. Dr. Lake begins a new series on the Bond Servant. What is a bond servant? How does it apply to New Testament believers? What is the connection between the bond servant and the Ten Commandments? Where Moses and Jesus perfect examples of bond servants for us? Is a bond servant to the perfect picture of maturity in Christ? Learn why becoming a bond servant of Messiah in the days ahead are so important for you, your family, and your ministry!

Watch Part 1 on YouTube Now


 

The Bond Servant – Part 2

Dr. Lake discusses the difference between the "House of Bondage" and the "House of God." Each house has different laws, holidays, and behavior. We need to learn the difference and live by the House of God.

Watch Part 2 on YouTube Now


 

The Bond Servant – Part 3

Whose house is it anyway? Have we become so democratically minded that we have forgotten the Church represents the Kingdom of God? Are we God-centric in our worship and service or people-centric. This message includes a prophetic warning that God once again is calling us "to repent, for the Kingdom of God is at hand!"

Watch Part 3 on YouTube Now


 

The Bond Servant – Part 4

Messiah came to set up free. In this lesson, Dr. Lake delivers a powerful message on how Messiah came to heal us of all the wounds from the House of Bondage. All pain, wounds of the past, mental anguish and torment were crucified with Jesus on the Cross. All this message to release an anointing for inner healing and a new level of freedom into your life!  POWERFUL SESSION.

Watch Part 4 on YouTube Now


 

The Bond Servant – Part 5

Did you know that Lucifer has an anointing? And that his anointing can ride on top of God’s presence and anointing? This is why the sanctification process is so important in the life of the believer. Dr. Lake provides a power illustration on how the priests in the Torah were consecrated for service to God and how it holds the key to purify our own anointing for God!

Watch Part 5 on YouTube Now


 

More Sessions to This Powerful Series Will Be Added in December.

 


 

BLCS_MIssion_VisionDeveloping Your Vision and Moving Forward in Your Mission in the Kingdom Tuition Special

As a leader in the Body of Christ, it is essential that you develop both your mission and vision in the Kingdom. Your education is a strategic part of both. Without the proper training, you will never teach your full potential in the service of God.

As you begin to plan out 2012 and beyond, BLCS is making these tuition specials available to ensure you receive the education you need to move forward. Now is the time to take the next step to your next level ministry!

Enrolling Using Plan B (Monthly Payment Plan): Down payment of $100.00 and no monthly payment for 60 days.

Enrolling Using Plan C (Full Payment with Enrollment): You will receive a 35% discount on tuition on all programs (except the Master of Divinity) – plus the book and lectures for your first module FREE. All Master of Divinity Programs will receive 40% discount on tuition – plus the book and lectures for your first module FREE.

Offer Ends December 31, 2011.

Coupon must accompany enrollment and cannot be used for programs by the National Chaplains Institute.

Visit the Biblical Life College and Seminary Website Now


Reminder

 

Reminder About Winter Break

Biblical Life offices will be closed from December 19 – January 1 for Winter Break. If you are needing to order materials for any BLCS modules in December, please make sure we receive them by the 16th. We will make sure all grading is completed and all orders are shipped before leaving for our annual vacation.

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The Bond Servant–Part 5

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Purify Your Stream of Anointing

 

The Bond Servant Part 5:  Did you know that Lucifer has an anointing?  And that his anointing can ride on top of God’s presence and anointing?  This is why the sanctification process is so important in the life of the believer.  Dr. Lake provides a power illustration on how the priests in the Torah were consecrated for service to God and how it holds the key to purify our own anointing for God!

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Biblical Life Assembly (includes free weekly messages in MP3): www.biblicallifeassembly.org

Biblical Life College and Seminary: www.biblical-life.com

Biblical Life Publishing: www.biblical-life.net

Biblical Life Monthly Teaching Videos: www.youtube.com/biblicallife

Unit 318: www.unit318.org

Follow Biblical Life on Twitter:  @biblicallife

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The Bond Servant–Part 4

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Jesus came to heal the brokenhearted!

 

Messiah came to set up free. In this lesson, Dr. Lake delivers a powerful message on how Messiah came to heal us of all the wounds from the House of Bondage. All pain, wounds of the past, mental anguish and torment were crucified with Jesus on the Cross. All this message to release an anointing for inner healing and a new level of freedom into your life!

=====================

Biblical Life Assembly (includes free weekly messages in MP3): www.biblicallifeassembly.org

Biblical Life College and Seminary: www.biblical-life.com

Biblical Life Publishing: www.biblical-life.net

Biblical Life Monthly Teaching Videos: www.youtube.com/biblicallife

Unit 318: www.unit318.org

Follow Biblical Life on Twitter:  @biblicallife

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The Bond Servant–Part 3

Posted on

The Bond Servant–Part 3

 

The Bond Servant — Part 3:  Whose house is it anyway?  Have we become so democratically minded that we have forgotten the Church represents the Kingdom of God?  Are we God-centric in our worship and service or people-centric.  This message includes a prophetic warning that God once again is calling us "to repent, for the Kingdom of God is at hand!"

=====================

Biblical Life Assembly (includes free weekly messages in MP3): www.biblicallifeassembly.org

Biblical Life College and Seminary: www.biblical-life.com

Biblical Life Publishing: www.biblical-life.net

Biblical Life Monthly Teaching Videos: www.youtube.com/biblicallife

Unit 318: www.unit318.org

Follow Biblical Life on Twitter:  @biblicallife

=======================

The Bond Servant–Part 2

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The Bond Servant–Part 2

 

In the Bond Servant – Part 2, Dr. Lake discusses the difference between the "House of Bondage" and the "House of God."  Each house has different laws, holidays, and behavior.  We need to learn the difference and live by the House of God.

=====================

Biblical Life Assembly (includes free weekly messages in MP3): www.biblicallifeassembly.org

Biblical Life College and Seminary: www.biblical-life.com

Biblical Life Publishing: www.biblical-life.net

Biblical Life Monthly Teaching Videos: www.youtube.com/biblicallife

Unit 318: www.unit318.org

Follow Biblical Life on Twitter:  @biblicallife

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The Future of Self-Improvement, Part I: Grit Is More Important Than Talent

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by Jocelyn K. Glei

[Note from Dr. Lake:  Thought everyone would find this interesting.]

 

Illustration: Oscar Ramos Orozco

In the late ’60s, Stanford psychologist Walter Mischel performed a now-iconic experiment called the Marshmallow Test, which analyzed the ability of four year olds to exhibit "delayed gratification." Here’s what happened: Each child was brought into the room and sat down at a table with a delicious treat on it (maybe a marshmallow, maybe a donut). The scientists told the children that they could have a treat now, or, if they waited 15 minutes, they could have two treats.All of the children wanted to wait. (Who doesn’t want more treats?) But many couldn’t. After just a few minutes or less, their resolve would break down and they would eat the marshmallow. But some kids were better at delaying gratification: They were able to hold out for the full 15 minutes.

When the researchers subsequently checked in on these same children in high school, it turned out that those with more self-control — that is, those who held out for 15 minutes — were better behaved, less prone to addiction, and scored higher on the SAT.
Recounting Mischel’s research in an excellent New Yorker article (that this piece could not exist without), Jonah Lehrer writes that, after observing hundreds of hours of videotape of the children, Mischel concluded that the kids who resisted temptation used "strategic allocation of attention":

Instead of getting obsessed with the marshmallow — the "hot stimulus" — the patient children distracted themselves by covering their eyes, pretending to play hide-and-seek underneath the desk, or singing songs from "Sesame Street." Their desire wasn’t defeated — it was merely forgotten. "If you’re thinking about the marshmallow and how delicious it is, then you’re going to eat it," Mischel says. "The key is to avoid thinking about it in the first place."

It’s not difficult to see how self-control would be predictive of success in certain spheres. It means trading short-term gratification for long-term goals, skipping the temptation to go to the movies and working on your novel instead. But that’s a relatively simple example — one that makes the decision to exercise, or not exercise, self-control easy to see.

In reality, we are faced with hundreds of these "tradeoff decisions" within the span of a single day. As the thoughtful blogger James Shelley has written, very often when we talk about the skill of "productivity" what we are really talking about is "self-control" — the disciplined ability to choose to do one thing at the cost of not doing another (perhaps more tempting thing).

Very often when we talk about the skill of ‘productivity’ what we are really talking about is ‘self-control.’

As the hierarchy of the traditional workplace breaks down, we are all gaining more freedom and flexibility. More and more, we can set our own long-term goals, we can determine our own work schedules, we can work at an office or at a coffee shop, we can make our own decisions about what we focus on today, and what we focus on tomorrow. But this "freedom" also brings responsibility — a responsibility that, I would argue, demands a vastly increased capacity for self-control.

In essence, Twitter is the new marshmallow. (Or Facebook, or Foursquare. Pick your poison.) At any given moment, a host of such "treats" await us. Emails, social media messages, text messages — discrete little bits of unexpected and novel information that activate our brain’s seeking circuitry, titillating it and inciting the desire to search for more. Our ability to resist such temptations, and focus on the hard work of creative labor, is part and parcel of pushing great ideas forward.

And yet: Self-control isn’t the whole story.

Intrigued by what qualities would most accurately predict outstanding achievement, Harvard researcher Angela Duckworth picked up where Walter Mischel left off. As she outlines in this TEDx talk, Duckworth found that self-control is an excellent predictor of your ability to follow through on certain types of difficult tasks — staying on your diet, studying for a test, not checking your email — but it’s not the most important factor when it comes to predicting success at "extremely high-challenge achievement."

Duckworth was also suspicious of qualities like talent and intelligence as reliable predictors for remarkable achievement. And with good reason: Way back in 1926, a psychologist named Catherine Morris Cox published a study of 300 recognized geniuses, from Leonardo Da Vinci to Gottfried Leibniz to Mozart to Charles Darwin to Albert Einstein. Cox, who had worked with Lewis M. Terman to develop the Stanford-Binet IQ test, was curious what factors lead to "realized genius," those people who would really make their mark on the world. After reading about the lives of hundreds historic geniuses, Cox identified a host of qualities, beyond raw intelligence, that predicted "greatness."

Studying Cox’s findings, Duckworth isolated two qualities that she thought might be a better predictor of outstanding achievement:

1. The tendency not to abandon tasks from mere changeability. Not seeking something because of novelty. Not "looking for a change."

2. The tendency not to abandon tasks in the face of obstacles. Perseverance, tenacity, doggedness.

Duckworth boiled these two characteristics down to a quality she called "grit," defined as "the perseverance and passion for a long-term goal," and set about testing it as a predictor for outstanding achievement. Here’s a recent New York Times article summarizing Duckworth’s research:

People who accomplished great things, [Duckworth] noticed, often combined a passion for a single mission with an unswerving dedication to achieve that mission, whatever the obstacles and however long it might take.


She developed a test to measure grit, which she called the Grit Scale. It is a deceptively simple test, in that it requires you to rate yourself on just 12 questions, from "I finish whatever I begin" to "I often set a goal but later choose to pursue a different one." It takes about three minutes to complete, and it relies entirely on self-report — and yet when Duckworth took it out into the field, she found it was remarkably predictive of success. At Penn, high grit ratings allowed students with relatively low college-board scores to nonetheless achieve high G.P.A.’s. Duckworth and her collaborators gave their grit test to more than 1,200 freshman cadets as they entered West Point and embarked on the grueling summer training course known as Beast Barracks. The military has developed its own complex evaluation, called the Whole Candidate Score, to judge incoming cadets and predict which of them will survive the demands of West Point; it includes academic grades, a gauge of physical fitness and a Leadership Potential Score. But at the end of Beast Barracks, the more accurate predictor of which cadets persisted and which ones dropped out turned out to be Duckworth’s 12-item grit questionnaire.

Duckworth carried out a similar "success study" with kids who competed in spelling bees. Again, it turned out that grit — in this case, the ability to persist and passionately pursue your goal of winning the spelling bee whatever it takes — was the best predictor of success. Verbal IQ scores were a factor, but they were inversely related to the grit scores. In essence, the smarter kids just didn’t try as hard, but still did pretty well sometimes. Self-control was also an influential factor, but not as reliable a predictor of success as grit, and not a completely necessary factor. That is, there was a subset of kids who had poor self-control but a lot of grit, who still performed very well.

If it was ever in question, we can now rest assured that dogged hard work is the cornerstone of remarkable achievement. That said, Duckworth’s findings still raise some nagging questions: Is grit an inborn ability, just like intelligence or talent? Or, can grit be cultivated?
We’ll continue to examine the innerworkings of remarkable achievement in Part II of this article series. In the meantime, you can take Duckworth’s Grit Scale Test here.

What Do You Think?
Can we develop our capacity for grit? How have you done it?

Jocelyn K. Glei is the Editor-in-Chief of 99%.

Copyright © 2006-2011 Behance LLC

 

Source:  http://the99percent.com/articles/7094/The-Future-of-Self-Improvement-Part-I-Grit-Is-More-Important-Than-Talent/print

The Bond Servant–Part 1

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Learning to Become a Bond Servant of Messiah

 

The Bond Servant – Part 1: An Introduction.  Dr. Lake begins a new series on the Bond Servant.  What is a bond servant?  How does it apply to New Testament believers?  What is the connection between the bond servant and the Ten Commandments?  Where Moses and Jesus perfect examples of bond servants for us?  Is a bond servant to the perfect picture of maturity in Christ?  Learn why becoming a bond servant of Messiah in the days ahead are so important for you, your family, and your ministry!

=====================

Biblical Life Assembly (includes free weekly messages in MP3): www.biblicallifeassembly.org

Biblical Life College and Seminary: www.biblical-life.com

Biblical Life Publishing: www.biblical-life.net

Biblical Life Monthly Teaching Videos: www.youtube.com/biblicallife

Unit 318: www.unit318.org

Follow Biblical Life on Twitter:  @biblicallife

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